Scootacar Register

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About the Scootacar Register

 

Hello and welcome to the Register. The official website for the Scootacar.

I have been running the Scootacar Register since 1980's and have over 75 members worldwide and have records of 150 cars of which 120 are still known today.

I produce a newsletter at least once a year and can supply many replacement parts both old and new.

To contact the Scootacar Register please email scootacar@btinternet.com or telephone 01263 733861.

If you would like to join the Scootacar Register then please click here.

 

Regards

Stephen Boyd

My story

When you first catch sight of the Scootacar you may consider it resembles a telephone box on wheels, but you either love them or hate them. It would be fair to say that it's not as popular as some of the other micro cars from the same period, perhaps not having the same aesthetic appeal, but the shape and design does certainly grow on you.

I purchased my first Scootacar way back in 1979, a 1963 Mk1, which I still own. I already owned an Isetta and had joined the newly formed Isetta Owners Club. I caught the micro car bug fairly quickly and was eager to purchase any micro car that became available. Owners of micro cars at the time were quite excited that I had found a Scootacar and were asking what type I had bought. A standard or low line? I had no idea!

With the help and support from Gordon Fitzgerald and Tony Marshall I gathered information on this British built car and decided that I would start the Scootacar Register. Both Gordon and Tony were themselves owners and knew of other cars. The main aim of the Scootacar Register is the same today as it was then, to locate and record all known or previously known Scootacars.

Edwin Hammond was actively trying to persuade as many fellow Scootacar enthuasiasts as possible to attend the 1979 National Micro Car Rally. It had been arranged for Henry Brown, the designer of the Scootacar to be the guest of honour at the event and to present the various prizes. Edwin did a briliant job, and even Henry arrived in his own yellow MKII Scootacar.

I used the National Rally as a platform to promote the idea of a Scootacar Register and was pleased with the response. In January 1980, I sent out my first four page newsletter "Scootabout" and in March of the same year, I sent out the second listing of 27 cars of all three types, with a membership of 16 including myself. Today worldwide membership is approximately 75 with over 150 cars on the register.

It is often quoted that some 1500 cars were manufactured, but from the records that I have compiled that the figure is somewhere between 900 and 1000. The Mk1 Scootacar (Earlier referred to as the standard model) accounted for most of the production, with approximately 750 being built on the Hunslet Locomotive site in Leeds. Later saw the production of the Mk11 (known as the low line) of around 200, with just a few of the Mk111 version. It shared the same body but had the larger engine for improved performance.

Many Scootacars have been restored over the years in various parts of the world with the odd one or two being restored at any given time. Parts are generally available and with a little patience it's still possible to put a Scootacar back on the road without too much trouble. The Scootacar Register is able to help out with either component parts or technical information to assist in restoration projects. Many owners hold onto their cars, but a couple change hands every year. The Scootacar Register is also able to help out with V765 applications.

 

© June 2009 Scootacar Register (Mark Boyd)