Scootacar Register

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About the Mk3 Scootacar

Mk3 Scootacar

The Mk3 Scootacar was introduced in 1962 with a price tag of £377. The Mk2 Scootacar had been introduced in 1960 to compete against the Mini and the Mk3 yet a further attempt with a more powerful engine but unfortunately the Scootacar’s days were numbered. Eventually the Mini and other economy cars killed off the Scootacar along with many other micro cars.

As far as I am aware the exact production figures for the Mk3 were never published but what I am sure about is that only a small number of cars came off the production line, probably less than 20.  Survival rate however has been quite good, with some 13 cars known to the Scootacar Register.

However, being the rarest model of the three types of Scootacar with only a small production run has not really enhanced its value.  Most owners or prospective owners of Scootacars seem to prefer the body shape of the Mk1 and so I generally value all three types the same.
Mk3 2

 

Externally the Mk3 Scootacar was the same as the Mk2 except for the rear of the car which had two holes in the bodywork under the rear bumper for air intake.

Obviously the main difference between the Mk2 and the Mk3 was the power unit. The Mk3 was fitted with a Villiers 3T twin cylinder; 324cc fan cooled two stroke engine with a four speed gear box, incorporating Electric Starter/ Generator for forward and reverse running.
Mk3 3Villiers had introduced the 2T in 1956. The vertical twin had a bore and stroke of 50mm and 63.5 giving 249cc. Each barrel had its own crankshaft separated by a central disc in the crankcase holding a central bearing with a roller bearing on the magneto side and a ball bearing on the sprocket side. The small ends were made of steel backed with brass bushes. Alloy heads were fitted to cast iron cylinders.
The 3T was introduced in 1957 with the bore widened to 57mm to give
 the 324cc. (2 x 162cc) and therefore an ideal replacement for the 197cc
 engine which had been fitted to the Mk11.

There were other minor differences between the Mk2 and Mk3 but most
 associated with the engine fitment, having a different cradle arrangement
 and of course a different Speedo !

Not very much was written about the Mk3 Scootacar but those who tested it thoroughly enjoyed it. There are a couple of well known road tests which used the same test car “3573 UM”  :  
Mk3 4MOTOR CYCLING December 7th 1961   
SMALL CAR            January 1963

Scootacars Limited used the same sales brochure as that produced for
 the Mk2 and just attached a sticker with the additional information
relating to the Mk3, that being the Engine, Transmission and Battery.

The Maximum speed was quoted as being around 68mph and was
 therefore among the fastest of the small capacity three wheelers.
I am currently restoring a Mk3 and have been advised on more
than one occasion by Henry Brown, the designer of the car, that it
is over powered and can be quite dangerous to drive !

Should you be able to help out, I would like to know the location of
 the windmill featured in the “Motor Cycling” road test of 1961.
Can you help ?

Techincal information about the Mk3 Scootacar

This information has been displayed to show the differences against the Mk1 and Mk2.

Scootacar model Mk1 Mk2 Mk3
Scootacar name Standard De-Luxe (Low Line) De-Luxe twin (Low Line)
Approx production 750 200 20
Aprox % of total 75% 22% 3%
Approx No of cars known 160 35 13
Approx % each car known 21% 18% 65%
Start of manufacture 1957 1960 1961
Finish of manufacture 1964 1965 1965
Length 7ft 3" 7ft 11" 7ft 11"
Width 4ft 4" 4ft 4" 4ft 4"
Height 4ft 11.5" 4ft 9.5" 4ft 9.5"
Unlaiden Weight 4.5cwt 5.25cwt 6.0cwt
Wheelbase 54" 54" 53"
Track 45" 54" 54"
Ground clearance 5" Not known Not known
Standard colours red, blue, ivory Silver, grey-red, blue silver grey-red, blue
Approx percentage 60%,20%20% 90% 10% 90% 10%
Engine Villiers single Villiers single @15 degrees Villiers twin
Bore 59mm 59mm 57mm
Stroke 72mm 72mm 63.5mm
cc 197cc 197cc 324cc
Compression ratio 7.25:1 7.25:1 7.25:1
Max power output 8.4 BHP 8.4 BHP 16.5 BHP
Engine spoket 20 teeth x3/8 pitch 20 teeth x3/8 pitch 25 teeth x3/8 pitch
Max power 4000rpm 4000rpm 5000rpm
Spark plug/s HH14 HH14 HH14
Spark plug/s gap 0.18-.025" 0.18-.025" 0.18-.025"
Battery neg earth 12v 18 amp hr 12v 18 amp hr 12v 32 amp hr
Contact breaker gaps 0.20-0.22 0.20-0.22 0.20-0.22
Inigition timing 11/64 before tdc 11/64 before tdc 3/16 before tdc
Clutch Villier 4 plate Villier 4 plate Villiers 4 plate
Chain 0.375 x 0.225 x 0.250 0.375 x 0.225 x 0.250 0.375 x 0.225 x 0.250
Pitches Unknown 58 pitches 62 pitches
Final drive ratio 4.65:1 4.65:1 3.92:1
Tyres Mitchelin 400x8" 400x8" 400x8"
Front tyre pressure 18lbs/sq inch 18lbs/sq inch 22lbs/sq inch
Rear tyre pressure 32lbs/sq inch 28lbs/sq inch 40lbs/sq inch
Brakes front lockheed Hydraulic Hydraulic Hydraulic
Brake rear (Hand brake) Cable Cable Cable
Max Speed 50mph 49mph 68mph
Fuel Consumption @ 30mph 80mpg 80mpg 96mpg
Fuel capacity 2.75 gallons 2.55 gallons 2.55 gallons
Lubrication SAE30 20:1 20:1 20:1
Option Spare wheel/tyre Fitted as standard Fitted as standard
Option Reversable engine Fitted as standard Fitted as standard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©2009 Scootacar Register (Mark Boyd)