Scootacar Register

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Stonham Barns 2009

I was in my mid twenties when I purchased my first Isetta and over the years my children have grown up with bubble cars. I started the Scootacar Register within a year of being involved with micro cars and so my boys have always helped with buying and selling spares, models and memorabilia from a young age.

During their teenage years my two sons lost some of the interest in bubble cars, although Mark has owned scooters since the age of 15, and still owns a couple of Vespa’s.  

My younger son Philip purchased a Mk1 Scootacar a couple of years ago and has managed to sort out most of the problems encountered on his own. Mark found himself driving my Mk1 Scootacar instead of using his scooter in order that they could drive out in convoy (you may have seen the video clips on You Tube) and eventually decided that it would be better to have his own car.  Another Mk1 was purchased but this required almost a total restoration, which was completed in just over a couple of months.
Stonham Barns
In early July having just finished the restoration, Mark and Philip decided that it would be a good idea to attend the rally at Stonham Barns in Suffolk.
The 50 mile journey to Suffolk only took about an hour and a half which included negotiating Norwich and was a good trial run for the newly restored car which had only covered a handful of miles before the trip. On arrival at the campsite they were welcomed by Dave Arnott who was pleased to see a couple of Scootacars for the line up and they were both made very welcome by all those who attended. Both Mark and Philip were able to remember a few familiar faces from attending the EAMCC meetings and National Rallies as children.

Along with my daughter Emma and Marks fiancée Helen, they all enjoyed the various events over the weekend and Philip even gave an interview to Radio Suffolk which was broadcasted a couple of weeks later. Mark was also very pleased to accept a trophy for his Scootacar as the “People's Choice” on the Sunday.

Hopefully, with a new generation of enthusiasts the Scootacar Register and other clubs will continue to survive well into the future.

Scootacar corner Stonham Barns 2009

As mentioned, my children have grown up with bubble cars and accept them for what they are, but I wonder what today’s children think of them, compared to say the new Mini, Fiat or Smart Car.

And so.........................what would a Scootacar look like today ?

In recent years the body designers have re-interpreted the traditional design and unmistakable shape of both the Mini and the Fiat 500, creating an authentic design reflecting both the character of the classic mini cars and the up to date appeal of the predecessors. With more essential modern surfaces they have been able to enhance the contemporary look and improve the aerodynamic efficiency. So how would the Mk1 Scootacar look today given a similar makeover?
Why not send in your ideas. I’ll feature the design which in my opinion keeps the charm of the original shape.

 

 

©2009 Scootacar Register (Mark Boyd)